Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Chocolate Muffins

I had a huge craving for chocolate muffins this weekend. My craving only increased when I ate one of those packaged chocolate muffins which are simply not as good as fresh baked ones.

I’m still on the search for my ultimate chocolate muffin recipe. The ones I’ve tried either aren’t moist enough, don’t have enough chocolate flavor, etc.

These muffins were light and moist, but they weren’t exactly what I’m looking for. I think I want more chocolate flavor and a batter that is more muffin-y. I guess my ideal chocolate muffin recipe would be a bit sweeter than a breakfast muffin, but not as sweet as to be mistaken for a cupcake. Anyone have a great chocolate muffin recipe I should check out?

Chocolate Muffins (recipe from Dorie Greenspan, From My Home to Yours, found on epicurious)

Ingredients

3/4 stick (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (I used semi-sweet chocolate chips)
2 cups all-purpose flour
2/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups buttermilk
1 large egg
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions
1. Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

2. Butter or spray the 12 molds in a regular-size muffin pan or fit the
molds with paper muffin cups. Place the muffin pan on a baking sheet.

3. Melt the butter and half of the chocolate together in a bowl
over a saucepan of simmering water; or do this in a microwave. Remove
from the heat.

4. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder,
baking soda and salt. In a large glass measuring cup or another bowl,
whisk the buttermilk, egg and vanilla extract together until well
combined. Pour the liquid ingredients and the melted butter and
chocolate over the dry ingredients and, with the whisk or a  rubber
spatula, gently but quickly stir to blend. Don’t worry about being
through – a few lumps are better than overmixing the batter. Stir in the
remaining chopped chocolate. Dived the batter evenly among the muffins
cups.

5. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until a think knife inserted into the
center of the muffins comes out clean. Transfer the pan to a rack and
cool for 5 minutes before carefully removing each muffin from its mold.

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Do Re Mi House revisit

Do Re Mi House is one of our favorite spots for Korean food in San Diego. We love the nice staff and the unlimited amounts of banchan that leave us extremely full.

The last few times we’ve come, the place has been packed. It’s seems their business has really picked up since our initial visit, which you can read about here.

After we ordered, we were immediately started off with some pickled cucumber and noodles.

Afterwards, the banchan started coming. There were 10 total. More than I’ve had at any other place. And while the majority of them are vegetable based, I love that they are so generous with their banchan. Most Korean restaurants let you refill on these dishes, but at a lot of the ones I’ve been to, they aren’t so generous about giving you a refill. A lot of places won’t ask you if you want a refill and I hate to be the one initiating the request.

Here, they are happy to give refills. They even have a sign posted inside the store about it. In addition to the 10 banchan, there is also a steamed egg (Gaeran jim). I love, love steamed egg and I love how this one comes out still bubbling and cooking.

The prices have gone up since my initial post, so I should have take new menu pictures but I forgot.

I ordered the pork sparerib soup after reading a post about it on yelp by Faye.

I enjoyed this dish and we had come on a chilly night, so this was perfect. The meat was tender and came off the bone easily.

BF ordered the beef bulgolgi which was cooked with onions, mushrooms and broccoli. I liked how lean the meat was. At some places, the meat is full of chunks of fat.

Even though I knew we had too much food, I was craving dukboki, which was on their appetizer list, so I ordered it.

Unfortunately, I was not a fan of their version. This dish usually has ramen noodles, but it cost extra to add it. There were chewy rice cakes and dumplings and cabbage, along with a hard boiled egg. Even though the dish was served warm, it tasted like it hadn’t been freshly cooked, but had been sitting around and reheated.

Other than this dish, we liked everything else. They refilled out banchan dishes right before we finished eating, so we ended up packing up banchan with our leftovers. It’s amazing how we always end up with so much food here even though we just each order one dish. It’s enough for a full dinner and leftovers for the next day.

Do Re Mi House
8199 Clairemont Mesa Blvd
San Diego, CA 92111
(858) 565-2085
Do Re Mi House on Urbanspoon

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Challah Bread

After making the braided milk bread last week, I really wanted to try my hand at making challah bread. Challah bread is a soft, egg bread that is eaten by Jewish people during certain holidays. I’ve seen different styles of the bread, but my favorite shape is the six strand braided version.

As I set about researching how to braid the bread, I remembered that my brothers used to make challah bread all the time when they worked at a bagel store. So this first time around, I cheated, and enlisted their help. I should have taken some step by step photos, but forgot. I’ll do it next time.

The challah breads I’ve eaten have always been adorned with sesame seeds. We put some on initially, but then I didn’t like how they looked. I liked the bread better without the seeds. Also the seeds kept making a mess when I was taking pictures and kept dropping on the floor. Since I was watching little bro’s girlfriend’s adorable little puppy during this, I decided to take off all the sesame seeds, so the puppy wouldn’t eat any that fell. Of course by the time I realized the sesame seeds had made little indents in the bread, it was too late.

For the recipe, I chose this one. Since I’ve never made challah bread I didn’t want to tweak around with the recipe. The only difference is that I didn’t do the double braids. Instead we did the braids similar to this video.

The bread came out super soft. I’ve read that the bread makes good french toast so I plan on trying that. It also makes great sandwiches.