I’ve really dropped the ball on making and trying new holiday themed recipes this year. It’s been a super busy year with wedding planning, house hunting, craziness at work. I’m especially sad about not doing Easter recipes because there is so much cuteness surrounding Easter with bunnies and chicks. And of course there are all the brunch item ideas.

Anyhow, I thought I’d do a roundup of past Easter themed recipes I made for people still looking for ideas. Hopefully I’ll be able to squeeze in at least one new to share with you later.

Sour Cream Bunny Buns

Chicks in Cups

Bubble Buns

Bacon Egg Pancake Cups

Colorful Marbled Eggs

Fried Bacon Eggs

Address? Unknown. Menu? Unknown. Guests you will be eating with? Unknown. Cost? Donation based. This is about as much information guests invited to an underground dining experience at Wolvesmouth are initially provided with.

We’re still in the beginning of 2012 and I have a lot of meals planned for this year, but I’m already making the prediction that my recent Wolvesmouth experience will definitely appear on my Top Ten Memorable Meals list.

Fur, bones, skulls. You know, your typical Wolvesden decor.

Underground supper clubs became all the rage in 2011, but perhaps the most sought after underground dining experience in Los Angeles is Wolvesmouth, headed by Chef Craig Thorton and his team. Wolvesmouth offers about 3-4 public dinners a month and getting an invite is a lot like trying to win the lottery. A dinner consists of 16 people, but generally this means only 8 people are chosen since each person is allowed to bring one guest.  If you are lucky enough to be chosen, you’ll receive an email with a physical address about 12 hours before your dinner. You’ll find out who you are dining with and what you are eating once you arrive.

I first heard accolades about Wolvesmouth over a year ago from various LA bloggers. I immediately put myself on the email list, which alerts you to the public dinners offered. I’ve been following along the various posts on both public dinners and private, including one jaw dropping 40 course private birthday meal. Again and again I put my name into the lottery pool with no results. It’s been an annual tradition that for my birthday weekend, FH and I go to Los Angeles to try out some special restaurant I’ve been dying to try. This year, I couldn’t seem to come up with anything in particular that I really wanted (other than Wolvesmouth). I ran a list of choices by my LA food adviser KungFoodPanda, but he vetoed everything I suggested, telling me it wasn’t worth my time. When I asked him what he would recommend, he replied that nothing in LA was interesting to him right now other than a dinner at Wolvesmouth. Of course that didn’t help me since I’ve already been trying for over a year.

I was entranced by this painting, which has many paintings within the painting. Every time I studied it there were a new pair of eyes I found, a new creature hidden beneath another.

Then, a week before my birthday, an email announced that they were doing a public dinner on the same day I had originally set aside to celebrate my birthday. Hoping for some birthday luck, I put my name in the pile again. And on a day when millions of people were learning that they did not win the Mega Lottery, I won my own personal lottery. (Actually, technically FH got the invite. I knew he was good for something ;-).)

We arrived at the designated spot at the designated time. Other guests soon began to gather and introductions were made. Then we were ushered up to the Wolvesden, a spacious loft where our dinner would be held. The dinners are considered dinner parties and I soon found out why. Once we entered, we were encouraged to mingle with the Wolvesmouth crew. We were allowed to be in the kitchen, look over the ingredients, talk to them while they prepped and cooked. You could stand right next to them at the stove if you wanted to. I had assumed that we would be watching them cook from afar, but being able to be in the kitchen with them was such an indescribable experience.

Here's Chef Craig Thorton at the stove. Skinniest chef ever.

The menu consists of a single sheet of handwritten notes posted on the fridge and the public dinners are usually around 10 courses. Yes, that’s right. 10. One thing I liked was that after each course was served, they would record what time it was served, so you could see the pacing of the meal.

Aren’t these adorable? I love the mini portable form and you can eat these without using any utensils.

I got the idea after seeing these mini pot pie cupcakes. I wanted to do something similar, but wanted to fill them with something else. And I came up with creamy macaroni and cheese.