Strawberry Raindrop Cake

This strawberry version of the original raindrop cake makes a fun and light dessert.
After successfully making the raindrop cake (read my original post for more background information on the raindrop cake), I’ve been wanting to make one with a fresh strawberry in the middle. I came across this variation when I was researching how to make raindrop cakes. Unfortunately, because I’m in the US, I couldn’t find the cool agar which the Japanese use to have a crystal clear raindrop.

When the strawberry is added, it definitely slightly muddles the color of the cake so it isn’t quite as transparent. But I think it still looks quite nice.

I’ve made the raindrop cake several times now. I know the raindrop is basically just water, but when eaten with the roasted soybean flour and syrup, it’s such a light and refreshing dessert that works so well in the summer. And for those of you in Southern California, the raindrop cake is now available at Smorgasburg LA. Hopefully I’ll get to try it soon!

Please refer back to my original post for more details on the process of making these and for photos of the ingredients needed.

SPECIAL TOOLS

Freshware 6 Cavities Half Circles Silicone Mold (You can also make these in sphere ice molds)

Strawberry Raindrop Cake

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/8 tsp + 1/16 tsp agar powder (make sure you use pure agar powder)
  • 2 firm & ripe strawberries, washed clean (you want them ripe, but still very firm. if you choose strawberries that are overripe, they will break down inside your raindrop)

toppings:

  • 1/2- 1 tbsp roasted soybean flour
  • 1-2 tbsp black sugar syup

* see original post for photos of the toppings

Directions:

1. In a small saucepan, add agar powder and water and stir with a spatula a few times, until the agar powder dissolves into the water.

2. Turn your stove top to medium heat and bring the agar water mixture to a low boil. Maintaining a medium heat level, allow mixture to boil (without a lid) for one minute, then turn off heat. Try to be as accurate with the timing as possible. If you don't heat long enough, your agar won't be fully dissolved. If you cook too long, your mixture will condense down too much. Use a spatula to stir the mixture a few times.

3. Wait a few minutes until liquid has cooled down slightly. Make sure you don't wait until it is fully cooled, otherwise it will already start to solidify. You just want it cool enough that the liquid won't cook your strawberries. Carefully place a strawberry into the center of each mold. Pour mixture into molds, covering the strawberries. You should have enough liquid to fill two cavities with a little liquid left over if you are using the silicone molds I used.

4. Place molds into the fridge to set. I recommend letting them set overnight, or at least 10 hours. When finished, the raindrop cakes should be solid and come out in one piece, but they should feel delicate and barely set. They should easily slide out once you loosen the edges. The cakes are quite delicate, so be careful when lifting them onto your plates. Do not take the cakes out of the fridge until you are ready to serve because they will start to melt after 20-30 minutes. Add your cakes to a plate. Add some soybean flour to your plate and drizzle black sugar syrup on top of the cake or on the side.

All images and content are © Kirbie's Cravings.

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4 comments on “Strawberry Raindrop Cake”

  1. What a beautiful dessert!  I love the shape and how clear it is.

  2. So adorable !

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