Kirbie's Cravings

Rice Cooker Japanese Cheesecake

Fluffy, Japanese-style cheesecake cooked in a rice cooker. It’s especially great for when you don’t have access to or don’t want to use the oven.
photo of a slice of Japanese Cheesecake

I am always fascinated by recipes that Japanese people like to make in their rice cookers. I’ve done the rice cooker pancake and now I’m sharing with you a rice cooker cheesecake.
close-up photo of Japanese Cheesecake
If you aren’t familiar with Japanese-style cheesecakes, they are much lighter compared to American cheesecake. They are more like a sweet cheese flavored souffle cake. I love the light, cottony texture.
photo of a slice of Japanese Cheesecake with a fork
I went through quite a few failed batches before figuring this one out. I do love how it tastes though and I’m happy I didn’t have to turn on my oven as this rice cooker uses less electricity and doesn’t heat up my kitchen.
photo of a whole Japanese Cheesecake

I do have several notes and detailed instructions so that hopefully your first attempt will be successful. A few things to keep in mind:

– This works best with multi-functional rice cookers, ideally one that has a cake setting and uses a non-stick pot. I used my 5.5 cup fuzzy logic rice cooker. If you have one that only has a button to turn it on, it can theoretically be used but the results aren’t as great and you have to keep pressing the button down as it will pop up every few minutes thinking your “rice” is done.

– Allow the cake to cool in the fridge for about an hour before eating. When it is first finished, it will have a strong egg flavor and you won’t really taste the cheese. Once it sets in the fridge, you’ll find the cake is sweeter with a stronger cheese flavor.

– I have some more tips stated in the recipe instructions based on what I learned from my failed attempts. Please read through them all before starting.

Rice Cooker Japanese Cheesecake

Servings: 8
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Japanese
Japanese-style cheesecake cooked in a rice cooker.  
5 from 3 votes

Ingredients

  • 227 grams (8-oz block) cream cheese softened
  • 2 large eggs whites and yolks separated
  • 80 grams granulated sugar approximately 6 1/2 tbsp
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 40 grams cake flour approximately 5 tbsp
  • 200 ml skim milk I made it with skim milk, but I think it should also work with low fat or whole
  • powdered sugar for dusting on top of the cake

Instructions

  • In a large glass mixing bowl, add cream cheese. Your cream cheese needs to be very soft, otherwise it will not mix into the batter properly and you will end up with little lumps of cream cheese. I recommend heating it in the microwave (cover top of bowl with paper towel because sometimes it does splatter) at 10 second intervals, until you can whisk the cream cheese to look like a smooth frosting.
  • Once cream cheese is whisked to a smooth state, add egg yolks. Whisk until batter is smooth. I found from my attempts that it is important to mix everything until smooth after each additional new ingredient, otherwise it will be too hard to remove the lumps later. Add in sugar and whisk until batter is smooth. Add in lemon juice and whisk until batter is smooth.
  • Sift cake flour into the batter. The sifting is important. If you just add it in, the flour remains clumped up (I even tried beating it with an electric mixer and it didn't smooth out the flour lumps.) However, if you sift it in, you only need to whisk a few times for it to be easily blended into the batter. I do not own a flour sifter, so I simply pour the flour into a sieve and lightly tap the sieve against my other hand (the one not holding the sieve) until all the flour is sifted through. After flour is sifted in, whisk batter until smooth.
  • Add in milk and gently whisk into batter until smooth.
  • In a clean bowl of a stand mixer, add egg whites. Make sure your eggs whites and bowl did not come into contact with any oils, otherwise the egg whites will not whip properly. Whip the egg whites on high speed until stiff peaks form.
  • Add the egg whites to your batter in 3 batches. After each addition, gently fold in the egg whites as you do not want to beat out all the air that you whipped into the egg whites. It's okay if the egg whites do not completely mix in. There should still be a few small lumps and streaks of egg white remaining once the egg whites are folded into the batter.
  • Thoroughly grease the interior of your rice cooker pot. I used a 5 1/2 cup rice cooker for this recipe. Pour batter into the pot. Close rice cooker and press "cake" function and start. If your rice cooker does not have a cake function, choose the white rice option and you may need to press for a second cycle after the first cycle finishes. Cook cake for about 40 minutes. You can open your rice cooker towards the end of cooking time to check progress of cake. The cake should be pulling away from the sides of the rice cooker, the surface should have an even cooked color and the cake should bounce back when you touch it. Cooking time will vary depending on the size of your rice cooker as well.
  • Place a plate on top of your rice cooker pot and carefully invert. The cake should slide down onto the plate. Place cake in the fridge for at least one hour to set and for the cheese flavor to fully develop. If you attempt to eat it right away, the cake will taste eggy and not very sweet. Once it is set, it is much sweeter and you can taste the cheese flavor. Dust with powdered sugar before serving. Store uneaten cake in fridge.

Notes

  • This works best with multi-functional rice cookers, ideally one that has a cake setting and uses a non-stick pot. I used my 5.5 cup fuzzy logic rice cooker.  If you have one that only has a button to turn it on, it can theoretically be used but the results aren't as great and you have to keep pressing the button down as it will pop up every few minutes thinking your "rice" is done.
  • If you do try to use a rice cooker that only has a button to turn it on, it will take longer to cook and the cake does collapse more. I did attempt it in a very basic, one button, 3 cup rice cooker. After 10 minutes, the cook button popped back up. I would then have to wait about 5 minutes before I could press it down again. And then it would pop up after another 5-8 minutes. The cake did continue to cook in the heated pot even when it was off so it does work but it is annoying to have to continuously turn it back on every 10 minutes. Also because this was a 3 cup rice cooker, the cake took longer to cook.

The nutrition information provided are only estimates based on an online nutritional calculator. I am not a certified nutritionist. Please consult a professional nutritionist or doctor for accurate information and any dietary restrictions and concerns you may have.

Did you make this recipe?I'd love to see it! Mention @KirbieCravings and tag #kirbiecravings!
Rice Cooker Japanese Style Cheesecake

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49 comments on “Rice Cooker Japanese Cheesecake”

  1. Mine was a complete fail. We have a induction zojirushi (no cake setting but I used the white rice setting). So being induction I would think that it would get equally cooked from all sides like our rice. But when the time was up it was pulling away from the sides and Iput the plate on top and inverted it like the instructions say and the top was burnt and it collapsed into an ugly pile ?

    • Sorry to hear it didn’t work for you. As we say in the post, this works best with multi-functional rice cookers, ideally one that has a cake setting and uses a non-stick pot. I used my 5.5 cup fuzzy logic rice cooker.

  2. This recipe is AMAZING. I’ve never made cheesecake before and it came out perfectly- just as good as store/restaurant bought. Thank you for sharing!!

  3. Wow! Halved all the ingredients as I only have a one-function 5-cup pot, and whipped the white with a plastic fork, but it turned out pretty good. Like if a soufflé and creamy custard had a baby. Almost reminds me of a cheesecake chain called Uncle Tetsu, but lighter. Thank you!

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